Monthly Archives: December 2013

Day 365 : perseverance

365perseverance

Sandy: Whoot! Whoot! I did it! Today I am celebrating 365 days, an entire year and now the last day of going of Right-2-Left, being a dominant right-hander to primarily using my left hand. I still have a fascination with left handedness even though I’ve achieved a lot with mine and it’s not a mystery any more. I won’t stop using my left hand because I am dual handed now. If one hand gets tired or bored with monotony, I can use the other hand. My left hand actually does some tasks better than my right hand. I was amazed to discover that I can draw with my left hand, sometimes better than with my right.

Three hundred sixty-five days and seven sketch books later, I am done. I accomplished what I set out to do. Even though some entries were lightweight, I am proud to have written a post everyday which continued to challenge me throughout the year. When I thumbed through my sketch books it made me smile so I know it was a good thing.

Thanks for reading and for all the encouragement! It’s a new year! Happy, happy!

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.

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Day 364 : physical

364physical

Sandy: Positive impact physically from using my left hand over my right : My left hand and it’s fingers are stronger. Earlier in the year my left hand would get tired after writing for a short time. I have much better small dexterity and can write very small legible letters. I have the option to use one hand or the other. Using my left hand makes my brain work unlike when using my right hand when my brain is on autopilot. I feel more balanced, not so right heavy.

Negative impact: My left shoulder and left neck muscles gets really tight just like the kind I get on my right side. I subconsciously lift my shoulder, somewhat like I’m holding a shrug up. I don’t know why, but the muscle tenses when I use the mouse, chop food, when I draw and occasionally when I’m just sitting and it should be in a relaxed state.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 363 : awareness

363awareness

Sandy: Using my left hand has been like living in another person’s shoes which gave me a better understanding of the difficulties left-handers might face daily. Also I became aware of how tasks done normally and naturally with one hand is harder for the other, in part because it lacks strength or coordination and is unaccustomed to doing the task because it is taking the brain longer to process something that it thinks it knows how to do but is being asked to do it flopped or the opposite way. I expect my right hand to be better at everything but when styling my hair for instance, it seems to loose it’s dexterity. I had high expectations to master tasks quickly and easily but had to be more patient and not give up when I did things clumsily and not so perfectly. I think the right to left process is similar to a toddler or child who is developing their dexterity. The drawing is of me as a toddler (appears I favored my right hand at that age).

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 362 : knowledge

Sandy: I learned so much while doing research for this blog, not only from research studies on left-handedness but about artists, the 50 U.S. states, flowers, the brain, genes, architecture, past U.S. Presidents, furniture, new words, musical instruments, twins, knot tying, furoshiki, glass blowing, chocolate, cartoonists, writers, Hawaiian alphabet, athletes, and more. It was interesting to hear my friends’ perspective about being left-handed. When Kelly participated it was helpful to get her insight and see if she shared similar experiences using her less dominant hand.

One of my intentions was to exercise my brain. Coming up with subject matter, doing research, writing and forcing my left hand to draw what I see was a challenge.

My art could have been better. I regret not being able to spend more time with each rendering. I would have liked to use different mediums and paper but stuck to the decision of only using specific notebooks which limited us to a pretty small-sized image. It was difficult to create detailing, especially with the pastels.

Little did I know how much time would be required for a decent post each day. But I did it – set up and posted a blog for a year!

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 361 : adapting

361adapting

Sandy: I found left-handed shears in my Christmas stocking. They work a lot better than the ones designed for right-handers. They felt a little awkward to use them in my right hand but worked well enough. Of the left-handers I asked, it surprised me that none owned left-handed shears. Instead, they’ve adapted to the right hand world and use their right hand to cut with shears or scissors.

Navigating as a lefty, I’ve only felt inconvenienced a handful of times which is probably not so true for most lefties who have been adapting all their life. Chairs that have tabletops  attached to the right side don’t work well for left-handers and are a legitimate complaint. Smearing ink or lead when left-handers write is more a function of how one holds their pencil/pen in relationship to the paper and also because they haven’t turned the paper about 20 degrees clockwise. The problem I faced was that the writing instrument obscures the last letter written and I can’t judge how much space to make before writing the next letter. Maybe that is why some people (children) write with their hand cupped around clockwise, not because of smearing.

Sitting next to a right-hander while eating with my left hand never posed a problem. We never seemed to need more elbow room. I’m not sure what all the fuss is about when a left-hander has to sit on the corner with his/her left elbow on left edge of the table.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 360 : boxing day

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Sandy: Since 1871, December 26, dubbed Boxing Day, has been a national holiday in England, Wales, Ireland and Canada.  Currently it is also a bank holiday in other places including Hong Kong, Australia, New Zealand, Kenya and South Africa. There seems to be discrepancies over it’s origins and no one seems to really care but the practice distributing money and boxfuls of gifts to the less advantaged, domestic help, tradesmen and employees is the tradition. It has also become a day of playing and watching professional sports such as cricket, rugby and football (soccer), and fox hunting. For us it was a day to sort through our belongings. We discovered a few coats and sweaters in great condition as well as several boots that someone might be able to use.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 359 : partridge

359partridge

Sandy: Until recently, I didn’t know the origin of the song “The Twelve Days of Christmas”. The counting starts on Christmas day and ends Twelfth Night, on the eve of the Epiphany. It was an English chant dating back to 1780 suggesting that with each successive day, a grander gift would be given or received. A Christmas Price Index (CPI) was created for yucks by a U.S. bank, tracking the costs of all items in the song since 1984. In 2013 the cost would be over $27,000 which include hiring the milkmaids, drummers, etc. The cost would be more if the calculation were for the accumulated amount of items as repeated in the song, thus called the True Cost of Christmas – over $114,000.00. The song just lost it’s cuteness.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


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