Day 87 : arts & crafts

ArtsCrafts

The Arts and Crafts movement began in England as an rebuttal to the over decorated Victorian style. When it was embraced in the USA, it was referred to as American Craftsman. The style – rustic, folk-like, a refined medieval look – was anti-industrial.

Sandy: We have some Arts and Crafts style furniture and lamps which makes our house feel homey and down to earth. I cheated on my drawing of the side table. I used a straight edge and mechanical pencil so I could replicate the table with some precision since my left hand is so unreliable when drawing a straight line.

Kelly: My neighbors have either a real or reproduction of this Gustav Stickley‬ Adjustable Back Chair in their living room. Personally I think they are uncomfortable and not the type of chair you cuddle up with a blanket and book in. But… apparently because Stickley’s company operated for less than 20 years, original works in good condition are rare. It is particularly his early furniture, produced between 1901 and 1904 that is considered rare and ultra collectible. In 1988, Barbra Streisand paid $363,000 for a Stickley sideboard. Stickley’s work was popularly referred to as being in the Mission style, though Stickley himself despised the term as misleading. In 1903 he changed the name of his company, to the Craftsman Workshops, and began an effort to market his works — by then including furniture as well as textiles, lighting, and metalwork — as Craftsman products.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.

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2 responses to “Day 87 : arts & crafts

  • jlarkin

    Sandy, is it hard using a ruler with the other hand, too?

  • rtwol

    It was hard for my right hand to be in a position to hold the triangle still. I had a lot of trouble having the triangle on the right side of the line I wanted to draw because the spiral binding was in the way. Some of the time I drew upside down in order to keep the lines parallel.

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