Monthly Archives: March 2013

Day 90 : japanese

Japanese furniture design philosophy was different from Bauhaus and Arts and Crafts in that form followed function instead of there being no distinction between form and function. Most Japanese homes have very little furniture but there was a lot of useful meaning for each piece.

90japanese

In Japanese, kaidan-dansu means step chests. They were created to serve a dual purpose – as storage and as steps –  and typically were made to be movable, made with draws and sometimes sliding doors.

Kotatsu is a large and very low table that has a heater underneath. The focal point of a Japanese room is kotatsu, it is like a dining room in a typical American house. Kotatsu is where the Japanese spend the most beautiful moments of their lives with family and friends, drinking their tea, eating and talking.

Tatami is woven straw mats. Japanese rooms have several of them.

We cannot talk about Japanese furniture without mentioning the wonderful paper screens known as shoji. They are true art works and they are adorned with various art prints.

Read more: http://howtobuildahouseblog.com/a-unique-home-decorating-style-japanese-home-decoration/#ixzz2P9d744n5

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.

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Day 89 : bauhaus

89bauhausSimilar to the principles of Arts and Crafts design, the Bauhaus school believed an artist had a responsibility to meet the needs of society whether it was in graphic design, typography, architecture, interior design, or industrial design. Their goal was to merge the craft tradition with modern technology.

Sandy: The year before Ludwig Mies van der Rohe became director of the Bauhaus School in 1930, he designed the Barcelona chair. The functional, comfortable chair is ubiquitous in office buildings and homes. I would want a pair of these chairs in my home if my decor were modern.

Kelly: I would love this chair though it would not match a thing in my house. Again, not for snuggling but comfortable to hang in.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 88 : art deco

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Art Deco followed Arts and Crafts in the 1920s but was more elegant and looked modern. Many different materials besides wood were used – lacquer, leather, exotic skins, metal (stainless steel and aluminum). The variety of materials and geometric shapes defined this style.

Sandy: Most art deco furniture I find very appealing. The broad curves are sexy, the lines creating geometric shapes excite my design senses. I drew free-hand today which is more intimate than using a straight edge. For some reason, my vertical straight lines were less shaky than yesterday. Drawing a circle is really hard because it requires making a curved, never straight, line all the way around. I had to make tiny adjustments as I went along and it was hard to know where I would end up. I got lucky and the mirror came out the size I needed. 

Kelly: A furniture designer Joel Liebman made this bed. I can’t tell if I like it or not. It’s funky that’s for sure. 

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 87 : arts & crafts

ArtsCrafts

The Arts and Crafts movement began in England as an rebuttal to the over decorated Victorian style. When it was embraced in the USA, it was referred to as American Craftsman. The style – rustic, folk-like, a refined medieval look – was anti-industrial.

Sandy: We have some Arts and Crafts style furniture and lamps which makes our house feel homey and down to earth. I cheated on my drawing of the side table. I used a straight edge and mechanical pencil so I could replicate the table with some precision since my left hand is so unreliable when drawing a straight line.

Kelly: My neighbors have either a real or reproduction of this Gustav Stickley‬ Adjustable Back Chair in their living room. Personally I think they are uncomfortable and not the type of chair you cuddle up with a blanket and book in. But… apparently because Stickley’s company operated for less than 20 years, original works in good condition are rare. It is particularly his early furniture, produced between 1901 and 1904 that is considered rare and ultra collectible. In 1988, Barbra Streisand paid $363,000 for a Stickley sideboard. Stickley’s work was popularly referred to as being in the Mission style, though Stickley himself despised the term as misleading. In 1903 he changed the name of his company, to the Craftsman Workshops, and began an effort to market his works — by then including furniture as well as textiles, lighting, and metalwork — as Craftsman products.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 86 : shaker

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Far different from Baroque style is Shaker which is simple and functional. For example, the ladder-back chair is an attractive yet practical piece of furniture. It required little amount of materials and the different parts could be flat or rounded.

Sandy: The caption for my drawing should be “shaking chair” since I can’t seem to draw a straight line. This is not indicative of Shaker furniture which, simple as it looks, is precisely made with mortise and tenon joints, not with nails. I remember a professor in my college environmental design class saying that in some households, these chairs would be stored by being hung on a wall. On another note, I am getting better with using scissors when cutting my fingernails. Most of the time I am frightened of getting too close to the skin and may need some of that stuff dog groomers use when they cut the quick. Perhaps I should do a cut-out if my next illustration is too shaky.

Kelly: Shaker is much more my style though somewhat boring to draw. I like the more modern versions anyway. My husband is a carpenter and has made some really beautiful shaker-style pieces ranging from jewelry boxes to a large armour for the TV. Simple lines, light, clean wood. I drew the amour that has become obsolete due to the flatscreen that has taken it’s place. We love the “box” so we may cut it into the eaves of our son’s bedroom wall and use it for storage.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 85 : baroque

85baroque

The era of Baroque runs roughly from about 1590s to 1725. Its elegant and exquisite details were sometimes embellished with inlays of metal, tortoise shell, ebony and gilded carvings. The use of caryatids, female figured shaped table or chair legs, (in architecture serving as support columns) were introduced.

Sandy: This is my second worse drawing. Maddening because I couldn’t replicate the graceful swashes and beauty of baroque. 

Kelly: Reproduced French console table and mirror. ($3500 for anyone interested) I loved the curliques and thought they’d be fun to draw. Left-handed maybe… It was hard to try to get the two sides of the drawing to match because the mirror was fairly symmetrical (but I noticed not perfectly). The left side was going fine but when I went to the right side of the mirror I couldn’t seem to get the curls right. I should have just picked a corner of the mirror to concentrate on but my eyes were bigger then my hands. Does that make sense? Then I just sort of gave up and went for the overall look.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 84 : furniture

Throughout history, there was not a lot of consideration for left-handers when designing furniture, desks in particular. In fact there was little support for left-handed people; they were thought to be cursed by the devil, even in the 20th century. Parents and teachers alike would tie down a student’s left hand to force the child to use their right hand. Schools are a little more thoughtful today by having a small percentage of desks in each classroom to accommodate left-handers.

Kelly: I remember struggling with the right-armed desks in elementary school. It was always awkward and annoying to work at the righty desks.  As I got older I got good at finding the 1 or 2 lefty desks/class that were usually available. I’ve noticed in my son’s 1st grade class that they have the desks that open from the front so there isn’t a left/right issue for him. It seems to me like there are more left-handers than when I was in school.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


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