Monthly Archives: February 2013

Day 59 : time

59watch21

Sandy: This was my grandfather’s pocket watch. My dad had different ways of wearing it. In the 1940s and 50s, he had trousers that had small pockets at the waistband, designed just for pocket watches. He also tucked the watch into his right side watch pocket on his vest or in his trouser pocket. Some pocket watches have the release button on top so it can easily be opened with the thumb of either hand. 

I’ve been wearing a watch on my right wrist instead of my left since we began blogging. It took almost two months for me to stop looking at my left wrist to see the time instead of my right wrist. I think it took longer to remember because I am wearing a Jawbone UP on my left wrist so it feels like my watch is still there. My brain was a little confused because of the tactile sensation on both wrists. 

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 58 : eat cake

58cake

Sandy: Today is my birthday! February rocks with birthdays – my sisters, nieces and friends: AliceB, LindaM, JamieB, SuzanneA, EllenM, AmyT, LorryL, ElizabethW, DaphneC, AllisonC, SueP, CarolA, RobJ, CraigR. Happy Birthday to us!

Tricolor mousse is a one of my favorite cakes of many made by Cocolat, Alice Medrich’s conception. Her stores are no longer but Alice has published a few great cookbooks which includes our wedding cake, the Reine de Sabe.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 57 : who’s on first?

57Gehrig

Baseball has been steeped in American tradition since the 1850s.

Conventionally, left-handers played first base because they were better suited, with their mitt in their right hand, to field balls hit in the hole between first and second bases, making throws to second or third, and holding runners on base. But that has been changing since 1928 when 92 percent first basemen were L-H, including the great Lou Gehrig. There were 67 percent in 1941, then left-handed pitchers declined to 39 percent in 1998. Recently, the proportion of lefty first basemen has fallen between one-third and one-quarter. With designated hitters used in the American League, there is less bunting thus changing the way infielders have to play.

The SF Giants’ first baseman, Brandon Belt is left-handed. The Giants may sacrifice the left hand advantage and move Belt to the outfield so right-hander Buster Posey can play first base when Posey needs a break from playing catcher. Both Belt and Posey in the line up gives the team an offensive advantage.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 56 : sports

nadal

In certain sports, left-handedness is advantageous. For example, in baseball, where right-handed pitchers greatly outnumber left-handed pitchers, it is commonly known that a left-handed batter is more successful against right-handed pitchers than a right-handed batter. In fact, a lot of strategy is used, such as bringing in a relief pitcher to have an advantage over a certain batter, effectively to get a much needed out.

In ice hockey, there are many more left-handed shooters, and the majority of goaltenders catch with their left hand, forcing opponents to shoot left-handed.

In one-on-one sports, like fencing, boxing, tennis and table tennis, left-handers have an advantage because they are accustomed to playing against a right-hander. Right-handers have less  opportunities to play against left-handers and can be thrown off mentally and tactically.

Rafael Nadal, formerly a world number one ranked tennis player who has won eleven Grand Slam singles titles, went from playing tennis with his right hand to his left hand at age 8. At age 19, Nadal won the French Open title. It was the first time he had played in the event.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 55 : my glove

55baseball-glove

Sandy: This is my baseball glove from 6th grade. I pitched, not well, played Short Stop, and ran the bases pretty fast. I wrote my name on my glove using an engraver. I was so mad at myself for making a mistake. Thinking I had just written my middle initial, I made period after the letter A in my first name. Since then, the fear of making spelling mistakes haunts me whenever I do hand lettering. (Periods are now commonly used between first and last names in email addresses so I could think of it as being ahead of my time.)

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 54 : southpaw

From where does the term Southpaw originate?  Baseball!

54MadBum

For awhile, when all games were played during the day, early baseball diamonds were built so the pitcher faced west and the batter faced east. That way the late afternoon sun wouldn’t be in the batter’s eyes, keeping him safe from a pitch careening towards him. This meant the pitcher’s left hand was at his south side, hence the term Southpaw.

In 2012, there were about 39% left-handed pitchers in the MLB! That’s a lot considering left-handers make up only 10% of the overall world population. The World Series Champion San Francisco Giants had 5 lefty out of 12 pitchers. Most regular season rosters typically use about 4 lefties and 12 righties. Currently, the Giants 2013 active roster has 8 lefty pitchers and 12 righty.

Sandy: When I was young, my favorite pitcher was Sandy Koufax, a left-handed pitcher for the L.A. Dodgers. I never, never cheered for the Dodgers; I just felt a kinship for Sandy (left-handed, same name). Silly me.

The Cactus League starts today. The Giants play L.A. Angels.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


Day 53 : family crest

Our family crests.

53Farq_Krill

Sandy: Bremner, my married name, is part of the Scottish Farquharson clan. In the bottom left is a chop – 3 characters are my Chinese name and the bottom left character is Bremner.

Kelly: This one was hard to do because of all the swoops and curls (wonder if that is related to the “Middle high German word “krol” meaning curly?? Anywway, it hurt my hand to draw today for some reason.

Prince William of Wales, is left-handed. His great grandfather, Prince Albert, Duke of York aka King George VI was naturally left-handed. I read that his dad, King George V, tied a string to his young son’s left hand so that any time he used it instead of his right hand, the string could be pulled by the King or tutor. As a child, I (Sandy) would get my ear tweaked if I did something “wrong”. Do you think being forced to change his writing hand could have contributed to the Duke’s development of a stutter in his youth?

JeffP tells us he was well aware of his mom wincing when she saw him dealing cards or picking up a glass with his left hand after she made him use his right hand to write.

Sandy’s year long journey – going from being a right-hander to left-hander, and Kelly’s parallel trip as a left-hander doing things as a right-hander.


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